I listen to music, watch movies, and read books for work. I take pictures for fun.

 

mostly35mmsnaps:

Not typically the kind of thing I repost.  But Carlos Nunez is one of my all time favorite fashion/editorial type photogs.  Loads of this stuff is with a point and shoot - which I love.  Because it’s simple.  Just a guy workin’ the light with the model.  I dig the raw element to his images.  His commercial stuff is off the charts good too. 

mostly35mmsnaps:

Not typically the kind of thing I repost.  But Carlos Nunez is one of my all time favorite fashion/editorial type photogs.  Loads of this stuff is with a point and shoot - which I love.  Because it’s simple.  Just a guy workin’ the light with the model.  I dig the raw element to his images.  His commercial stuff is off the charts good too. 

(Source: ohsnapscarlos)

luckyshirt:

Hey, you know how you can tell Rdio and Spotify to tell facebook you’re listening to things RIGHT NOW?
Well so can I.
So I played Neil Diamond’s Forever in Blue Jeans on loop.
For 24 hours.
While plugged into facebook.
And only one person called me out on it.
One.
I’m not like most of you Hiltons with your legions of friends. But still. One person was worried about me listening to the same Neil Diamond song 400 times in a row. While cats were probably eating my eyes.
Screw you guys.

luckyshirt:

Hey, you know how you can tell Rdio and Spotify to tell facebook you’re listening to things RIGHT NOW?

Well so can I.

So I played Neil Diamond’s Forever in Blue Jeans on loop.

For 24 hours.

While plugged into facebook.

And only one person called me out on it.

One.

I’m not like most of you Hiltons with your legions of friends. But still. One person was worried about me listening to the same Neil Diamond song 400 times in a row. While cats were probably eating my eyes.

Screw you guys.

russellwalks:

Star Wars Racing for Topps: X-Wing 
“I was originally shooting for a seventies, Motor Trend magazine cover feeling here, using reference of Luke in his pilot’s helmet, which has always reminded me of a Formula One racing helmet. I struggled with some compositional issues for awhile before finally realizing that my problem was Luke,” says artist Russell Walks. 

“Each of the other pieces in the series focused on the vehicle, rather than the character, and it occurred to me that it might make sense to drop Luke and simply concentrate on that awesome helmet.”

The result is on this side. While Walks liked this image, he felt it didn’t fit with the other cards he’d already created - Hence his next (the third, for those of you counting), much simpler attempt, which drops both the helmet and the seventies theme, and, to his eye at least, belongs with the other cards in the series.

aayla:

“You know, Dr. Edwin Land was a troublemaker. He dropped out of Harvard and founded Polaroid. Not only was he one of the great inventors of our time but, more important, he saw the intersection of art and science and business and built an organization to reflect that. Polaroid did that for some years, but eventually Dr. Land, one of those brilliant troublemakers, was asked to leave his own company—which is one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard of.
So Land, at 75, went off to spend the remainder of his life doing pure science, trying to crack the code of color vision. The man is a national treasure. I don’t understand why people like that can’t be held up as models: This is the most incredible thing to be—not an astronaut, not a football player—but this.”
Steve Jobs describing one of his biggest heroes, Dr. Edwin Land in 1985.

aayla:

“You know, Dr. Edwin Land was a troublemaker. He dropped out of Harvard and founded Polaroid. Not only was he one of the great inventors of our time but, more important, he saw the intersection of art and science and business and built an organization to reflect that. Polaroid did that for some years, but eventually Dr. Land, one of those brilliant troublemakers, was asked to leave his own company—which is one of the dumbest things I’ve ever heard of.

So Land, at 75, went off to spend the remainder of his life doing pure science, trying to crack the code of color vision. The man is a national treasure. I don’t understand why people like that can’t be held up as models: This is the most incredible thing to be—not an astronaut, not a football player—but this.”

Steve Jobs describing one of his biggest heroes, Dr. Edwin Land in 1985.